Project Description

Camden County NJ

Welcome to Vorhess

You found the right website if you are searching for homes for sale in Vorhess, NJ. Our website has EVERY Vorhess home for sale in New Jersey listed with Bright MLS.

Voorhees Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township’s population was 29,131, reflecting an increase of 1,005 (+3.6%) from the 28,126 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,567 (+14.5%) from the 24,559 counted in the 1990 Census. Voorhees is a New Jersey suburb in the Greater Philadelphia Metropolitan Area.

Voorhees Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1899, from portions of Waterford Township. Portions of the township were taken on March 8, 1924, to form Gibbsboro.

The township is named for Foster McGowan Voorhees, the Governor of New Jersey who authorized its creation.

Native American tribes of Lenape were the first known occupants in the area that became Philadelphia County. The first European settlers were Swedes and Finns who arrived during 1638. The Netherlands seized the area during 1655, but lost control to England during 1674. William Penn received his charter for Pennsylvania from Charles II of England during 1681, and November 1682 he divided Pennsylvania into three counties. During the same year, Philadelphia was planned and was made the county seat and the capital of the Province of Pennsylvania.

Penn wanted Philadelphia, meaning “love brotherly”, to be a place where religious tolerance and the freedom to worship were ensured. Philadelphia’s name is shared with an ancient city in Asia Minor mentioned by the Bible’s Book of Revelation. It was William Penn’s desire, as a Quaker, that his “Holy Experiment” would be found blameless at the Last Judgment.

When established, Philadelphia County consisted mainly of the area from the Delaware River west between the Schuylkill River to the south and the border with Bucks County to the north; the western boundary was undefined. Two counties would be formed out of Philadelphia County, Berks County which was formed during 1752 (from parts of Chester, Lancaster, and Philadelphia counties), and Montgomery County established during 1784. From these separations, as well as other border changes, was created the present-day boundaries of the county.

The City of Philadelphia, as planned by Penn, comprised only that portion of the present day city situated between South and Vine Streets and the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers. Other settlements were made beyond the boundaries of the city, and in the course of time they became incorporated separately and had separate governments.

Several of these settlements were situated immediately contiguous to the “city proper” of Philadelphia, such as Southwark and Moyamensing in the south, the Northern Liberties District, Kensington, Spring Garden and Penn District to the north, and West Philadelphia and Blockley to the west — which combined with the City of Philadelphia formed practically one continuously urban area, the whole group being known abroad simply as Philadelphia.

Besides these, there were a number of other outlying townships, villages and settlements throughout the county. Over time, as the population expanded out from the City of Philadelphia, those closer to the City of Philadelphia became absorbed into Philadelphia.

During this period, the city government of Philadelphia and the county government of Philadelphia acted separately. By the mid-19th century, a more structured government bureaucracy was needed. A reform charter, on February 2, 1854, defined all the boroughs, townships and districts of the County of Philadelphia as being within the City of Philadelphia, thus abolishing the patchwork of cities, boroughs, and townships that had comprised Philadelphia County since its founding.

The city-county consolidation was a result of the inability of a colonial-type government by committees to adapt to the needs of a growing city for new public services, for example, better streets, police, transportation, sanitation and schools.

The newly integrated districts had marked characteristics between them, but over time, after the consolidation, these characteristics were generally integrated into the City of Philadelphia. Presently, the names of some of these old districts survive as the names of neighborhoods in the city, with their boundaries roughly matching their historic boundaries.

During 1951, a new law known as the Home Rule Charter merged city and county offices completely. This new charter provided the city with a common structure and outlined the “strong mayor” form of government that is still used.

The county offices were merged with the city government during 1952, effectively eliminating the county as a government. Even though the county no longer has a government structure by law, in both the Unconsolidated Pennsylvania Statutes and The Philadelphia Code and Charter, the County of Philadelphia is still an entity within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is thus subject to the provisions and laws of the Commonwealth concerning counties. Exceptions include restrictions stated in the Home Rule Charter of Philadelphia, Act of Consolidation, 1854, and subsequent legislation. The county also is the only First Class County, meaning it had a population of 1.5 million or more at the last census, in the Commonwealth.

Philadelphia has become racially and ethnically diverse over the years, and this process continues. Since 1990, (the year that immigration began increasing), thousands of immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Europe have arrived in the county. Presently, the city has some of the largest Irish, Italian, German, Polish, Puerto Rican, Korean, Vietnamese, Russian, Ukrainian, Jamaican, Chinese, Arab, Thai, and Cambodian populations in America. The county has the fourth largest concentration of African Americans in North America, including large numbers of Liberians, Nigerians, and Sudanese. The Northeast section of the city, and more significantly the suburbs of Philadelphia, contain large numbers of Indian Americans and Mexicans.

At the 2010 census, the city was 41.0% White, 43.4% Black or African American, 0.5% American Indian or Alaskan Native, 6.3% Asian, 0.0% Native Hawaiian, 2.8% two or more race, and 5.9% were some other race. 12.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 11.644 square miles (30.157 km2), including 11.492 square miles (29.764 km2) of land and 0.152 square miles (0.392 km2) of water (1.30%).

Echelon (with a 2010 population of 10,743) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in the western part of the township between Cherry Hill and Gibbsboro.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Ashland, Brighton Heights, Glendale, Kirkwood, Kresson and Osage.

Voorhees borders the Camden County communities of Berlin Township, Cherry Hill, Gibbsboro, Lawnside, Lindenwold and Somerdale. To the east is Evesham Township in Burlington County.

The Township of Voorhees is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. The Mayor and Deputy Mayors are chosen by the Township Committee from among its members during the Reorganization meeting each January.

As of 2019, the members of the Voorhees Township Committee are Mayor Michael R. Mignogna (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2020; term as mayor ends 2019), Deputy Mayor Deputy Mayor Jason A. Ravitz (D, term on committee ends 2021; term as deputy mayor ends 2019), Michael Friedman (R, 2019), Michelle M. Nocito (D, 2021) and Harry A. Platt (D, 2020).

Courtesy of Wikipedia.org

Nearby Schools

Market Stats

Buying a Voorhees Home?

If you are a Voorhees, NJ home buyer, our foremost goal is to provide you with exceptional customer service. Our goals are to help you purchase the right home, make sure you don’t miss out on any homes that meet your needs, and make sure you don’t pay too much for your next home. Please utilize our Voorhees, New Jersey real estate expertise to make your home search and buying experience as stress free and rewarding for you and your family as possible.

Search Voorhees Properties

Selling Your Voorhees Home?

If you're considering selling your Voorhees, New Jersey home, we utilize the latest, cutting-edge, real estate marketing tools to expose your property to the widest range of potential buyers. We are here to get your house aggressively marketed to sell as quickly as possible and for the best price! Our goals are to help you get your Voorhees, NJ home sold, put you in the strongest negotiating position as possible, and to make it easier for you and reduce surprises.

Get Your Voorhees Home Value

Voorhees Properties

More Properties

Explore Camden County